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In Nenets he is known as Yamal Iri ("Grandfather of Yamal").

Ded Moroz, and on occasion the Belarus Dzied Maroz, are presented in the media as being in on-going détente with various counterparts from other cultures, such as the Estonian Santa Claus (Jõuluvana or "Old man of Christmas"), the Finnish Santa Claus (Joulupukki or "Yule Goat"), and other Santa Claus, Father Christmas, and Saint Nicholas figures.

This version of the character is based on traditional imagery, especially as depicted by Maksim Gaspari in images commissioned in 1952.

Attempts were made in the mass media and advertising to replace Djed Mraz with Djed Božićnjak.Until the late 1940s it was also said in some areas of Slovenia that Christkind (called Jezušček ("little Jesus") or Božiček brought gifts on Christmas Eve.Slovenian families have different preferences regarding their gift-giver of choice, according to political or religious persuasion.Nevertheless, the image of Ded Moroz took its current form during Soviet times, becoming the main symbol of the New Year’s holiday (Novy God) that replaced Christmas.Some Christmas traditions were revived following the famous letter by Pavel Postyshev, published in Pravda on December 28, 1935.

Attempts were made in the mass media and advertising to replace Djed Mraz with Djed Božićnjak.

Until the late 1940s it was also said in some areas of Slovenia that Christkind (called Jezušček ("little Jesus") or Božiček brought gifts on Christmas Eve.

Slovenian families have different preferences regarding their gift-giver of choice, according to political or religious persuasion.

Nevertheless, the image of Ded Moroz took its current form during Soviet times, becoming the main symbol of the New Year’s holiday (Novy God) that replaced Christmas.

Some Christmas traditions were revived following the famous letter by Pavel Postyshev, published in Pravda on December 28, 1935.

The notion of Grandpa Frost was ideologically useful because it served to reorient the December/January holidays away from religion (Saint Nicholas Day and Christmas) and towards the secular New Year.