Balticsdating com

19-Apr-2015 20:36

They began singing songs that were explicitly about independence.

At a 1988 Lithuanian choir festival, singers unfurled a pre-Soviet Lithuanian flag on stage and blocked Soviet officials who tried to remove the activists from the stage. Within two years, the Baltic nations held government elections and negotiated independence from the Soviet Union. Then, in 1991, Soviet anti-independence forces decided to crack down.

He explains the context of each song—both the events at which it was sung and the speeches that surrounded it—and delves into political science theory and music therapy to better understand how songs became powerful tools of protest.

“What they had to build on was something very unique—this 150-year-old choir movement that recognized singing and songs as weapons, as something that could be adapted to a nonviolent movement. ### See the full story and more photos in Perspectives, the College of Arts & Sciences’ newsletter.

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Concert tickets are cheap: usually less than 2 lats. Peter's Church, also in the old town, offers celestial views from its observation deck. Filling and sprawling around the large former Zeppelin hangars, this colorful, photo-friendly market gives you a real insight into local life.For an unflinching look at Russian domination, tour Riga's Occupation Museum.English captions tell the relentless tale of Latvia's bleak history from 1940 to 1990, including the deportation of Latvians to Siberia.0 comments Riga's tall 19th- and 20th-century buildings give Latvia's capital a cosmopolitan feel and vertical accent unusual in the Baltics.Riga is the Baltics' closest attempt at a metropolis. This ethnic mix is potentially the Baltics' most explosive, yet you'll see very little friction. Latvia's major newspapers, such as the daily Diena, come out in both Latvian and Russian.

Concert tickets are cheap: usually less than 2 lats. Peter's Church, also in the old town, offers celestial views from its observation deck. Filling and sprawling around the large former Zeppelin hangars, this colorful, photo-friendly market gives you a real insight into local life.

For an unflinching look at Russian domination, tour Riga's Occupation Museum.

English captions tell the relentless tale of Latvia's bleak history from 1940 to 1990, including the deportation of Latvians to Siberia.

0 comments Riga's tall 19th- and 20th-century buildings give Latvia's capital a cosmopolitan feel and vertical accent unusual in the Baltics.

Riga is the Baltics' closest attempt at a metropolis. This ethnic mix is potentially the Baltics' most explosive, yet you'll see very little friction. Latvia's major newspapers, such as the daily Diena, come out in both Latvian and Russian.

The Old Town's formidable Dome Church dates from 1211.